1. I ran down one problem at a time.
    — Jen A. Miller,
    “Running as Therapy,”
    New York Times. (The whole thing is great and you should read it.)
     
  2. image: Download

    Today The Oatmeal launched his own running event, Beat The Blerch, named after the tiny demon he imagines following him when he doesn’t want to run. The race is September 21 in Carnation, WA (30 miles east of Seattle), a trail-ish race on the Snoqualmie Valley Trail. The race site promises free race photos, “I Beat The Blerch” T-shirts with entry and “birthday cake at every aid station.” 
So tempting. I have to go out to Washington fairly often this year anyway (albeit the other side). Cake!

    Today The Oatmeal launched his own running event, Beat The Blerch, named after the tiny demon he imagines following him when he doesn’t want to run. The race is September 21 in Carnation, WA (30 miles east of Seattle), a trail-ish race on the Snoqualmie Valley Trail. The race site promises free race photos, “I Beat The Blerch” T-shirts with entry and “birthday cake at every aid station.” 

    So tempting. I have to go out to Washington fairly often this year anyway (albeit the other side). Cake!

     
  3. 14:09 17th Mar 2014

    Notes: 162

    Reblogged from iron-inside

    Tumblr Challenge!

    redwhiteandjacked:

    Ok, so this challenge is designed to get you the body of your dreams!

    It’s so easy too!!

    Here’s the challenge:

    Workout, eat, and recover in a manner that will get you to your goal, for one year.

    Then wake up a year later with your brand new body!

    It’s so simple and easy!

    Exclamation point!

    !!!!

    !!!111!!111one.

    Can you please put this over a stolen photo of a super ripped woman with an unrealistic possibly Photoshopped body? Otherwise I can’t understand it. 

     
  4. image: Download

    Pretty proud of this one.

    Pretty proud of this one.

     
  5. 14:34 14th Mar 2014

    Notes: 8

    Aspirational. (Activate Apparel, $22)

    Aspirational. (Activate Apparel, $22)

     
  6. It’s my birthday! I’m 30. 
I wished so so hard for a snow day and the best I could get was delayed office opening. Well, it was worth a shot. Next year I’ll just take a personal day (if I can remember in time, and if I am lucky enough to have them) so as not to deal with annoying people. 
I have tried to stay as free from cultural baggage re. this birthday as possible. I was lucky that it wasn’t that hard. Only 1 person made a joke about me being 30, and it was a tremendous joke so that was fine. I was technically younger 10 years ago but I did not know who I was, and while I thought my shit was together, it was not. Having my shit together, even if I don’t always feel like I have it, is great. 
I’m going out to dinner tonight, destination unknown. I love surprises. 
So far, so good.

    It’s my birthday! I’m 30. 

    I wished so so hard for a snow day and the best I could get was delayed office opening. Well, it was worth a shot. Next year I’ll just take a personal day (if I can remember in time, and if I am lucky enough to have them) so as not to deal with annoying people. 

    I have tried to stay as free from cultural baggage re. this birthday as possible. I was lucky that it wasn’t that hard. Only 1 person made a joke about me being 30, and it was a tremendous joke so that was fine. I was technically younger 10 years ago but I did not know who I was, and while I thought my shit was together, it was not. Having my shit together, even if I don’t always feel like I have it, is great. 

    I’m going out to dinner tonight, destination unknown. I love surprises. 

    So far, so good.

     
  7. 17:35 11th Mar 2014

    Notes: 7

    image: Download

    My doctor’s having a sale! (I need a new doctor.)

    My doctor’s having a sale! (I need a new doctor.)

     
  8. bikesbrainsbetterliving:

    veggielife:

    reclaimingmyinnerbamf:

    This.

    ————-

    Ah yes, a healthy dose of condescension and fat shaming, framed as a backhanded compliment! How lovely.

    Apparently the “fatty” has responded.

    So next time you look at me on that track do yourself a favor. Look away. I do not look like I once did. I do not want to be your inspiration or your motivation.

    I am a runner. I was a runner at 420 pounds and I am a runner today.

    And runners do one thing.

    They run. Not write about other runners.

    Seriously, fuck that original facebook post. Fuck everything about it.

    Reblogging for the response from the runner.

    To clarify, the response quoted is not from the runner mentioned in that post, but from a blogger named The Anti-Jared who responded from his perspective of losing 200 pounds. 

    This post has been going around since December 2012 and who knows if there was ever a real runner involved. Top comment on the original Reddit thread: "I think the best form of respect is to treat an overweight/obese runner on the track the same way you’d treat any other runner.”

     
  9. I read all the weight-loss memoirs so you don’t have to. I stumbled across this woman’s website a few months ago and noticed her book was on sale for $2.99 on Kindle (still is) so I bought it and read it this weekend. 
Johnson lost 72 pounds in a year by adopting the mindset that she would get healthy and stick to her plan no matter what happens. That’s what she calls “the Shift.” This isn’t a diet book, although she talks about her diet a little (very low carb, Atkins-style), but more about building that mindset and being truly ready to make a change even when it’s the hardest. 
It’s a really fast read in easily digestible chunks (like a blog!) and frequently addresses keeping a balance between work, family, and health, but not in a “I’m doing it perfectly” way, nor in a “It’s impossible” way. 
The problematic part for me was the trigger in leading her to lose weight, a meeting with an ABC executive in which Johnson intuited that her job would be in jeopardy if she didn’t lose weight. (Way harsh, Tai.) Johnson both names and thanks the exec in the book, which is more magnanimous than I could be. I know TV is a sphere of unreality but if this book were by Todd Johnson, would he have been told to lose weight to keep his job? (Yeah, Al Roker, but still.) That kind of discrimination is legal, but definitely unethical. On the other hand, she acknowledges that she needed that threat to get herself motivated enough. 
Ultimately, it made me really grateful that nothing about my job depends on my weight (that I am aware of???), nor do I have to go on TV on a regular basis. 

    I read all the weight-loss memoirs so you don’t have to. I stumbled across this woman’s website a few months ago and noticed her book was on sale for $2.99 on Kindle (still is) so I bought it and read it this weekend. 

    Johnson lost 72 pounds in a year by adopting the mindset that she would get healthy and stick to her plan no matter what happens. That’s what she calls “the Shift.” This isn’t a diet book, although she talks about her diet a little (very low carb, Atkins-style), but more about building that mindset and being truly ready to make a change even when it’s the hardest. 

    It’s a really fast read in easily digestible chunks (like a blog!) and frequently addresses keeping a balance between work, family, and health, but not in a “I’m doing it perfectly” way, nor in a “It’s impossible” way. 

    The problematic part for me was the trigger in leading her to lose weight, a meeting with an ABC executive in which Johnson intuited that her job would be in jeopardy if she didn’t lose weight. (Way harsh, Tai.) Johnson both names and thanks the exec in the book, which is more magnanimous than I could be. I know TV is a sphere of unreality but if this book were by Todd Johnson, would he have been told to lose weight to keep his job? (Yeah, Al Roker, but still.) That kind of discrimination is legal, but definitely unethical. On the other hand, she acknowledges that she needed that threat to get herself motivated enough. 

    Ultimately, it made me really grateful that nothing about my job depends on my weight (that I am aware of???), nor do I have to go on TV on a regular basis. 

     
  10. Well, I’ll be.

     
  11. 10:00

    Notes: 13

    Tags: t-rexrunsforbrunch

    image: Download

    Guys. Last night I did 50 push-ups (9 on my feet!!!) and no joke, it was a struggle to put my coat on this morning. Also, I think I found my pec muscles?? Ooooof.

    Guys. Last night I did 50 push-ups (9 on my feet!!!) and no joke, it was a struggle to put my coat on this morning. Also, I think I found my pec muscles?? Ooooof.

     
  12. 11:00 9th Mar 2014

    Notes: 4

    Happy DST!

    Charging my Garmin in the hopes it’ll be light enough for me to run outside (and mind my footing) after work this week.

     
  13. The headline of this article makes me want to quit working out and I am not kidding. 

    It’s a profile of a new group-fitness gym here called “Fulton Fit House” incorporating circuit training, “functional fitness” and “primal fitness,” whatever those are. (It seems like a Crossfit box without the official branding, says my gut.) The owner is held up as a great example of fitness because he does 6 3-hour workouts a week and routinely goes for 9-11 mile runs just ‘cause. 

    Good for him, but who else has that kind of time? 

    Sure, if you own a gym and fitness is your job, then working out 18 hours a week is probably a great idea. If you’re training for an Ironman, or on a high-mileage marathon plan, these would make sense. If you’re training to work in fitness, so you have to teach classes, assist and do your own workouts, you can probably hit more than that. But that is a lot of time! I could probably carve it out, because I am a single person with no dependents or major family commitments and I have a job with a regular 9-5ish schedule. But I don’t want to most weeks because I have other priorities.  

    How often do sentences begin this way: 

    • It’s easy to be fit: All it takes is thousands of dollars of personal training on your own time. 
    • It’s easy to be fit: All it takes is this very expensive diet and total adherence to it.
    • It’s easy to be fit: All it takes is an uncomfortable surgical procedure whose long-term effects haven’t been fully studied. 
    • It’s easy to be fit: All it takes is incredible genetics coupled with very stringent rules for life. 

    We wonder why 25% of Americans don’t exercise at all (source: ABC News) and 80% of us aren’t getting the amount of exercise recommended by the CDC. (See if you can guess that recommended amount before you click on the source for that. I didn’t know it and it took me a while to figure it out.) And then we use all-or-nothing headline-grabbers to indicate that if you don’t have 18 hours, you’re just not doing it right. 

     
  14. Some coworkers fundraising for the Avon Walk are having an “all you can eat” bake sale tomorrow. With scones. I’ve never heard of this before (my last few offices were not the “bake sale type”). Can I even sign up fast enough? How many people will I horrify with my scone capacity?

    Some coworkers fundraising for the Avon Walk are having an “all you can eat” bake sale tomorrow. With scones. I’ve never heard of this before (my last few offices were not the “bake sale type”). Can I even sign up fast enough? How many people will I horrify with my scone capacity?

     
  15. 06:17

    Notes: 23

    Tags: foodnostalgianyc

    A very specific craving

    I want an egg and cheese sandwich on a roll from the deli that was a block away from my old office in New York. I used to go there some mornings when I had just worked out or, on the other hand, was hungover. Perfectly airy roll, fried egg, one slice of cheese. I want it to be still hot when I take it out of the foil and at that perfect melty state. And I want to eat it at my old desk, which doesn’t exist any more because the company moved downtown and I don’t work there any more. I want to go to my old gym, the one with the windows that face west toward NYU, and the weird cantaloupe-smelling conditioner, and change in a room full of sullen spin-class attendees. I want the guy at the deli to wave at me when I come in because he already knows what I want, because I only come in for this one thing. I want to stand on the platform at the 7th Avenue subway stop feeling virtuous with my comically oversize gym bag, with a dress for work and a library book stuffed on top. I want to wake up in my old apartment in Brooklyn staring out the grillework on the windows, knowing that I’m mostly going to make it to the gym this morning because I’ll have an egg and cheese afterward.